Concert Calendar
Aug 2016
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Upcoming Events

  • CIM@SEVERANCE

    September 21, 2016, 8:00 pm
    Severance Hall

    Cleveland Institute of Music Orchestra
    Carl Topilow, conductor
    Christianna Bates, viola, student artist
  • CIM@CMA: Music in the Galleries

    October 5, 2016, 6:00 pm
    Cleveland Museum of Art, 11150 East Blvd., Cleveland

    The popular series of monthly concerts in the galleries featuring young artists from the Cleveland Institute of Music and the joint program with Case Western Reserve University’s early and baroque music programs enters its fifth season. Outstanding conservatory musicians present mixed programs of chamber music amid the museum’s collections for a unique and intimate experience—concerts regularly feature instruments from the museum’s keyboard collection.

    From standard repertoire to unknown gems, these early-evening, hour-long performances are a delightful after-work encounter or the start of a night out. Programs announced the week of the performance.

    Free, no tickets required. More information is available at: clevelandart.org

  • CIM@HOME: Boulez Legacy Series

    October 5, 2016, 8:00 pm
    Kulas Hall

    THE BOULEZ LEGACY
    Boulez the Conductor

    Cleveland Institute of Music Orchestra 
    Steven Smith, guest conductor 
    Joela Jones, piano

The nature of academic communication is very similar to the applied study of an instrument. As a performance major, you have studied your instrument under a variety of musicians. You have been influenced by their creative approaches to interpretation, technique and performance. You have also drawn creative ideas from master classes and performances (live or recorded).

Your individual style is not only a synthesis of these voices but also includes your unique interpretation as you respond to these ideas. When you perform, you do not acknowledge these influences by interrupting your piece with citations. However, on your resume and in personal interviews you are likely to give credit to these influences.

Academic writing also involves a synthesis of ideas. When writing about any topic, it is important to ask the following questions: What has already been said about this topic? Who are the experts in this area? How do their perspectives relate to one another?

It is just as important as you reflect on these perspectives to develop your own "voice" or creative interpretation and ideas about the topic. Writing provides the opportunity to give credit to the source(s) of the ideas you discuss in your papers.

Plagiarism results from not giving credit to these sources and/or presenting their ideas as your own. A variety of services and resources are available to help you avoid plagiarism by understanding proper citation techniques and the value of honest communication in the academic world. Resouces for faculty members on how to address plagiarism in the classroom are also included in this guide.


What is Plagiarism?

According to Case's Academic Integrity Policy:

"Plagiarism includes the presentation, without proper attribution, of another's words or ideas from printed or electronic sources. It is also plagiarism to submit, without the instructor's consent, an assignment in one class previously submitted in another."

All of the following practices fall under the definition of plagiarism:

  • Quoting phrases/sentences/paragraphs from a source in your paper without using quotes and providing a citation.
  • Paraphrasing an idea from a source without a citation
  • Using statistics or facts from a source (outside the realm of common knowledge) without a citation.

Resources for Students

Resources for Faculty

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